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Mayor Ford: a classic example of the pathology of anger and addiction


As the mayor continues to self sabotage he exemplifies all the classic symptoms of some one with his issues which find in  anger  management With the addiction he starts with denial “I’ve never used”,  then he will minimize “Well maybe a couple” and he will rationalize “It probably happened when I was drunk”

301 Ford

 

 

 

 

 

All his responses are predicated by fear. That fear is as strong as he believes he will be annihilated if he doesn’t protect this front. None of his remarks have much rational thought, although it is logical to him. He has a weight problem that signifies too much food is part of his life, as it is probably a source of comfort to an unhappy person.

He carries a lot of anger, comes from a loner position, implying he has difficulty negotiating with others. He sees life  as a win/lose game  and finds compromise awkward. Generally isolation stems from a lack of trust, so the world is a hostile place. Much of his support come from people who resent authority. Ironically they see themselves as victims of  an unfair world. The exterior appears different, he exudes a sense of entitlement and pushes his way through with little understanding of how others react to him. It is easier to blame than to listen.

Sooner or later he paints himself into a corner with few options that lead to wilder and wilder accusations. Judgment becomes further impaired and he becomes more isolated. Ultimately there is a collapse: the system gets too overloaded or the opposition becomes too big.

People seem surprised at his actions but in this context should appear normal. While the process is wild and dangerous the end result is predictable

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One comment on “Mayor Ford: a classic example of the pathology of anger and addiction

  1. The blog about Rob Ford was very insightful. Especially the middle paragraphs – “He carries a lot of anger, comes from a loner position, etc….. Ultimately there is a collapse: the system gets too overloaded or the opposition becomes too big.” It is the outsider in each of us that feels a twinge of sympathy for the man, no matter how much we want to see him gone.

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